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to the doctor and all of those things. this is the way that technology can help people) distant connect with us. 75% of our users say that we work with others to provide care and support. today, ties is three years old, and we have learned a lot about lessons with the good life. our number-one lesson is that no one should have to face thelma's, disability, or caregiving on their own. there are growing numbers -- why we did pay attention to this, constantly reaching out in creating our own networks, keeping them informed is one major reason, there are more and more of us living alone. 40% of people over 60 live alone. we are more vulnerable in terms of how we are living and we are more vulnerable because those of us are living with chronic and complex diseases. that can lead and capacity to it is a very positive thing to do. what we might think of as our desire is for the company and so on, our health is a social affair. our health is intimately tied with our connections and support. when we have a good network around us, we heal more quickly, we live longer. and when we are isolated, it impacts
. finally, we also are using technology to join our private companies in hiring san franciscans. hopefully some of your kids, some of your grandkids as well, are going to enjoy some of these great jobs in san francisco, because the companies that are here, many of them have agreed to use the virtual hiring practice called hiresf.org and share the technology to hire online send franciscans. we're doing the right here in our great city. i have a chief innovation officer, jane, who is working in my office. he keeps a good connection for both me and them members of the board of supervisors to share in what are the technologies and what they're doing in san francisco and what the latest discoveries are that we can possibly use to help improve our city. finally, as someone you know, i celebrated my 60th birthday last week. [applause] and my staff gave me an ipad, and is looking at it -- i might have to go and join your classes to be able to appreciate all the applications that we have there. so do not be surprised if the guy next to you has a mustache. when i leave here this morning, i will be g
is not just about technology, it is about a spirit of being willing to solve problems for a larger (inaudible) that is what i have always kept as a close objective. my role in government. so it is with that i wanted to thank the number of people here, first and foremost, ted (inaudible) and america, and just this place, (inaudible) america that has been really very helpful to insight a lot more innovative spirit in everybody and i said what is your passion? and how can we get people who share that same passion to break the barriers of either the lack of technology or education level to really work together to collaborate even further. and so, we were... service, and we are (inaudible) america next year to become partner and tackle the issues that we have been struggling with in government. i also want to thank, mike (inaudible) he is here. mike is the head of a city hall fellows for quite some years. and in fact, i think that he is responsible for some set of (inaudible) of students that come through the city since 2008 helping us and helping the department solve problems and being additional
, this is part of our broadband technology grant, the average cost is zero. [laughter] if you were to buy this for your home, it costs a couple of hundred dollars. the games cost between $20.40 dollars. they have hundreds of different games to play. to the games cost between $20.40 dollars. and hundreds of different games to play. we have other adaptive devices that can be used with the wii. this is a foot pedal. -- this is a foot pedal. along with the buttons on the hand device connected to alicia's remote, we can use foot pedals if there are games the require numerous controls. it is very adaptive. then, really interesting. what about someone who may be a quadriplegic and does not have the ability to use arms or legs? there is a sip and tug adapter that allows someone to control the wii with his or her mouth. you can still engaged the wii by puffing into the tube. this company has made the wii completely accessible for anyone to play. it is a great option. if you want more information about the adaptive equipment for the wii, visit alicia's booth. >> i work for the independent living ce
technology. you know, way above what we have now. this is something very powerful, to be able to keep rovers going on the moon, in mars, things that could be useful, in your cell electric vehicles, something that just is a radical leap in new technology. but i don't want to go into a lot of detail on that. you'll hear more about nasa's efforts later. and what i'm going to do1r is ge a little more background on challenge-driven innovation. and i'm going to do that just by plaijerrizing some people because it makes it a loteasier for me. i want to look at this quote, prize is a very old -- an old idea that is surprisingly powerful in our modern society. this is by a study that by mckenzie and company, back in 2010. prize is a very old idea, very powerful in our modern society. surprisingly powerful in our modern society. mckenzie also said this, 32,000, in 2010, there were 32,000no competitions, competitions, prizes, awards. that's a big number. it could be bigger but it's a big number, for one year, 32,000 competitions happened. to continue on in myk mckenzie also said this, while tens of th
to the core of may. and that is why i have learned the necessary needs of technology whto learn and to grw at to do things. and why you and i need the things you're going to hear in just a couple of minutes. i just want to take a quick moment as you get settled. you will have to stop talking because i will not talk over you. you, too. i'm going to count to ten. i usually don't have to finish to ten. when you think of technology in the world today, we can't even imagine what is going to have the month from now. think of the things that have been eaten up. we used to have payphones. they are gone. the cellphone 8 it up. the cellphone 8 of the camera industry. you don't need to buy a camera. the cellphone 8 the watch industry. i don't even wear a watch. you can go through the list. he you don't have to go to the bank anymore. take a picture of a check and make a deposit. look at all the things that we have changed. and change every day. if we can't imagine what is going to happen by christmas time. you don't even have to go to the pharmacy to say, fill this out. pick up a phone, punch in, go
, you have got to see the magic mirror, that is something that is going to blend technology with your fashion. mr. yuni on behalf of the city in a way in which we are so proud, so thankful for this opportunity to welcome the flag ship here, we would like to declare this unico day here in san francisco. [ applause ] >> thank you, very much. mayor lee and thank you very much everyone. i think that we are ready now to spread the unico ribbon for the ribbon-cutting ceremony, yes? if we could have, here we go, just underneath, yes, please. yes, i think that everyone has, yes, thank you very much. so, ladies and gentlemen, we are going to do it on the count of three. we will go, 3, 2, 1 for our guests and for our executives, obviously we have a number of very interested photographers here so please give us your best unico smile possible. ladies and gentlemen, so if we are ready, 3, 2, 1, all right? >> 3, 2, 1... [ cheers ] >> thank you very much, everyone. and i think that we will be opening in probably... >> yes? >> we will be opening very, very shortly. one moment please. >> san francisco
in technology and industry alone. unemployment dropped from 9.6 when i started to 7.4 percent, third lowest in the state, and i said in other jurisdictions, i'll say it again, i think we contribute to marin and san mateo because we buy all the wine up north for all of our hotels and it's our airport that's keeping san mateo no. 1. so thank you very much for understanding that. but also to translate, that means 22,,000 or 25,000 san franciscoans are back to work and according to our federal labor department for the metropolitan area and just this area alone, we are the no. 1 job creator in the nation. no. 1 in san francisco. that's a credit to all of you. (applause). in commercial real estate we have experienced the strongest absorption rate since 1988, according to the 2011 data. this year we're looking to even best ourselves. we've got 78,000 square feet of positive absorption to date and forecasters are telling us to anticipate 1 1/2 to 2 million square feet by the end of this year. you don't need me to tell you how successful you are. just look around at all the cranes. in fact, i t
of water supply, wastewater, stormwater development -- these are independent technologies. but what came first, most often, was a water supply system. the basic system is essentially the same as we used back in the 19th century. and in some cases, some of the same pipes. grusheski: philadelphia was the first american city to develop a water system and to take on as a municipal responsibility water delivery to all of its citizens. when william penn laid out the city, he actually chose a spot of land that had a lot of groundwater. however, by 1730, 30,000 people lived within the first seven blocks of philadelphia, next to the delaware river. well, 30,000 people caused filth in the city and polluted their water sources. the groundwater was not potable. and in one year, 1/6 of the population died of yellow fever. now, they didn't know at the time that yellow fever was carried by mosquitoes. but the health issue was major in that first movement to build a water system. narrator: so they set out to find the cleanest source of water. although the majority of philadelphia's water now comes from
with this technology that can be scaled up into eco districts and community scale systems, campus-type systems where in those situations when the water is reused and the numbers are much higher, 50,000, 100,000, 200,000 gallons a day, imagine the savings on that that you're getting. you're not purchasing freshwater and you're not using the sewer and being charged appropriately. this wastewater processing and reuse technology is cutting edge. and although it's been successfully implemented in other cities, it will be one of the first such installations in an urban office building. >> here is a city agency that treats wastewater, but they send no wastewater to the treatment facility. that says a lot. >> it's got a 12 gallon per day occupancy using 5,000 gallons per day with a building officing 1,000 people. that turns out to save over 2.7 million gallons a year. >> the public utilities commission runs water, power and sewer services for san francisco. we can't afford to be out of business after an earthquake. so, we're thinking about building a building. that building is going to hold our operations c
to innovation. >>> 13 years ago, i like all of you started a company. i started in i-ti a technology company in the 1.0 world. it was a company that created technology to connect citizens better with government * . i ran it for almost nine years. and when i was elected to office four years ago, i was unfortunately more surprised than i wanted to be about how far behind san francisco government was. this was very 2008, 2009. with you i'm really proud of the leaps and bounds we have taken as a city * . i was proud in 2010 to help move forward legislation to really bring together city departments to work in a coordinated way with our committee on information technology. to help create a chief information officer position for the city. i was also proud to work with then mayor newsome in passing the first generation of open data legislation that we have. but as our civil grand jury in june pointed out, our i-t in san francisco is still in need of a culture shock. and this is where all of us come in today. we have 200 data sets that have already been put out there, but by and large the data sets p
barriers for accessing technology, and it will be a brainstorming session where someone from my office and a couple of other people will be leading a discussion of what issues people run into and how you deal with them. i think it is a really important topic and i think it is probably one of the most important things people could be talking about now. for all of us, technology is here and going to be here, and we all need it. thank you very much. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. thank you. i am really pleased to be up here -- well, not really, but you're so pleased to be able to tell you about two things before lunch -- i am pleased to be able to tell you about two things before lunch. as you know, this is the middle of a process to train and teach more people how to use computers. we wanted to showcase a little bit of what folks are learning out there. first, we will show a video, and then wind up -- linda will explain about lunch. i know a few people have slipped over there, but i ask everyone to be quiet for a few minutes. there is plenty to go around. the video we're goin
thousands of more jobs, creating an environment that will be welcoming of the new economy, technology, and innovation to reinforce what we have been saying. we are the innovation capital of the world. with your help and involvement. we would like to have the rest of the city picked up and be part of it as well. we think we can have that conversation. we will need your help. we will need you to represent the new industry. these companies are here to keep the dialogue and collaboration at a high-level going with us. it is the ongoing dialogue like the one we are reading about a new tax structure for the city that does not punish the inventiveness we want to have. i would like to open with that introduction, welcome all of you here. i think he will see and hear an exciting introduction of these new companies. they're going to raise questions we do not have the answers to yet, but i do believe we have the spirit in this city to welcome solutions with your involvement. we will have the ability to do this on line as well is in these forums. i will be part of the ongoing discussion. i want t
of america. we also live in the technology center of what is going on in the nation and maybe the world. we really wanted to draft off the modern cleanliness of those companies, of google, twitter, apple, yahoo!, facebook. probably forget someone. they are fueling the economy, we want to draft off that. that makes this interesting. we added a hash tag to the name. no one's done that. we want the bay area -- i guess there are 8 million, maybe more or maybe less, we want them all to participate. by this logo it says come on, let's show the nfl we are in this together that. is pretty much it. [applause] >> short and sweet. thank you, rich silverstein. listen, the ceo of the 9ers is here. obviously this is not happening if the 9ers are not building a state-of-the-art, brand-new facility. we are excited to see it. it is going up fast. will it be ready in time for super bowl 50. we hope we have the honor of hosting it. mr. york. [applause] >> it is a pleasure to be here and bid for super bowl 50. the last time there was a super bowl in northern california i wasn't quite 4 years old. you have sup
, but how we get a lot of voices in, and maybe technology is an answer here. i am a big fan. >> [inaudible] i would love to hear from each one of you with the city could do in terms of regulation to help your businesses. we talked about the tax issue. what with each of you say is an issue the city could help with. >> i will start. one thing we would like to see is to make parking easier. we want it to be as easy to share your car as possible, and if you when your car and the renter cannot find a parking spot, that is an issue we need to solve. there are actually great models from around the world in terms of on street parking or some sort of system to not only encourage car owners to share, but also not discourage people from using private car sharing because parking is an issue. we have been piloting this a little bit, and we hope to actually see something come out around parking. obviously, the other issues we have discussed impact any of the schering economy companies. you could also see opportunities to educate the public or just gain awareness for the services through the city and exi
a lot of panels up there already but doesn't fill all the roof tops and there is new technology coming out all the time. we have been challenged in the solar technology arena because traditional technology has heavy weight technology that always challenged the integrity of roof tops, and moscone is the one we found and let that be for one of these companies and light ultralight technology and use, cheaper way of getting solar out there and we're going to allow them to demonstrate their product on top of our mos connie roof and that is an example we're doing in utilizing all of the agency's cooperations and make sure the start ups can use real testing sites in the city. that is thanks to the hardand kelly and the manager at puc and barbara hale and the second thing we're going to do is take a page out of what we're doing with clean tech and biotech life sciences. you see what mission bay is doing. they have for the last ten years building up a ecosystem of pharmaceutical companies and san francisco medical center and integrated around with the research teams to form a very strong res
are right behind me. to some of the leading technology companies in the valley. we have companies that raise anywhere from a thousand dollars to $25 million that have sort of been housed with us. some of the coolest things that have happened at the hatchery two people sitting next to each other working on the same app for six months decided to merge and raise a million dollars for their company. so, collaborative consumption is something we truly believe in and having spent a couple of years working with the likes of jane, brian, tina lee and a bunch of other people who have been sort of working on this open data problem, it's been sort of exciting to sort of see it come to fruition today and see sort of the progress that they've made. so, for me this is sort of -- it's been fun to sort of watch this team of people come together and do what they do and make san francisco a 21st century city. so, you know, it's an honor to welcome the mayor back to the hatchery, the new hatchery. we invite you, supervisor chiu, to our monthly infamous happy hours where bourbon and branch caters to meet with o
sure that all communities have access to life changing technologies. [applause] high-speed internet connections make it possible for patients in rural areas to consult with medical specialists who are hundreds of miles away, for students to take online classes and universities across the country, and for governments to deliver services more efficiently and more easily to their constituents. for seniors, especially those whose families may live in different states or in different countries, broadband allows families to bond together in a way that telephone just never did. my own parents and all live in mexico city, and we are lucky because we both of broadband connections in our home. if a few weeks ago we got on skype. we set up the computer in our kitchen, and they set it up in their dining room but they instructed my husband and me as we tried to make one of their favorite meals. and they kind of scoffed when we were beating the dough too much and smiled when we had an almost round 40 a. for us, it is a the best way to connect because they live very far away and we do not get to s
in power, with sewer, with water that are not always proven technologies, but they're things that are enough proven you should take a bit of a risk and you should show others it can be done. >> we're showing the world, suddenly had wind turbines which they didn't have before. so, our team realizing that time would change, and realizing where the opportunities were today, we said, you know what, we started out as really something to control wind as an asset, when you combine today's technology becomes something entirely different. >> wind turbines in an urban environment is a relatively new concept. there are a few buildings in other major cities where they have installed wind turbines on the roof. and wind turbines in buildings are effective. >> the discussion was do we do that or not? and the answer was, of course. if they're not perfect yet, they're building a building that will last 100 years. in 100 years someone is going to perfect wind efficient turbines. if these aren't right, we'll replace them. we have time to do that. >> the building that's two renewable energy gene
. a big logo slide. >> and we're supposed to be about the technology. >> imagine a big stop bullying speak up logo on the slide behind me. >> say that again. >> stop bullying, speak up is the name of the campaign and a nice transition. my complements to everyone in the room. if i have learned everything in the last four years while researching bullying prevention and for our age group and the kids in the second through seventh grade it's that not only does it take a village but a village of people who are willing to partner and collaborate with each other and speak not only to adults about this issue but speak to children and i think it's an interesting transition from mia's work to mine. still not mine. >> it is but -- >> and the role we play at cartoon network and thousands of kids at home everyday and the role we play is taking that information, translating it and content on the line and when kids come independently to our screens to play games and watch television and do a variety of things we have information for them on information they care deeply part. in 2008 as research we do
in common is we use technology -- in our cases, an online platform -- that actually lowers the barrier -- the barrier of entry so people across the social spectrum can engage. you do not need to have a second home in a fancy condo buildings in this city. you can have an extra count that you want to rent out, and you can find access to travelers from all over the world who also do not have the resources to spend money on a $200 hotel bill who want to say on your couch, and that is really democratizing travel, not just access to travel, but also access to the tourism economy that flourishes in the city. >> i just want to address the technology point really quickly. we try and emphasize the human aspect of this, whether it is on the website or whether it is through the iphone app. other people use a device that we built, that lets you share a car more conveniently by letting the richer unlock the car with their smartphone. even with that, we really try to connect the people who are sharing because a lot of people to accept rentals just with the kit and may never meet the people they are s
capital. there has been 15 years of sustainable development with development of new green technologies. in 2011, we have the largest out of carbon ever. inequality has reached epic proportions around the world. in the united states, the richest 1% owned 38% of all wealth. the bottom 90% hold 73% of all debt. we are wiping out the planet and the public is left holding the bag. we definitely need something completely different. putting the moral outrage aside for a second, this situation also puts cities at great risk. we've only gotten a taste of the destruction that -- disruption as possible with the numerous revolutions that broke out. the crisis will land hardest in cities. i see city's borrowing language from complexity theory, i see the boys and a critical state. it is a new situation. 50% of global population is urban, young, and connected by mobile phones. the young are the hardest hit here. in spain, the unemployment rate for young adults is around 50%. in the united states, college graduates are leaving school with an average of $24,000 in student loan debt into labor market fo
't like the term "cyber bull" and it's about the technology but not the behavior itself. we don't actually use the world cyber bullying. we talk about the behavior and there is tons of research we're doing in how people are behaving on our platform and the tools we can give them to resolve their issues and either through themselves and trusted audiences, et cetera, or turn to us and we don't use the term "cyber bullying" and we don't think about it's the technology. it's about the behavior itself and i know there is ongoing debate with that and cyber bullying captures people's attentions and everything i have learned from anne and the nonprofit community and the academic folks who have researched this when you use a term like "cyber bullying" you are diminishing the behavior and placing it on the technology. >> personally i hate it. it suggests robots and not humans at all. let's think about humanity, not technology. >> so i want to show you a couple of things and show you my version of a sizzle reel which is not sizzle and i am also mindful it's 4:00 o'clock on a friday so
i'd ask if there's other technologies that you think that you have that you want to share about that may be helpful as we start to get into fire season. please share those with us. ray, if you'd like to start. >> sure, thank you. first off, thanks for being here, it's my first time being here and i think it's an outstanding venue to meet the cooperating agencies and talk about policies and ways we can improve our response to the public that we serve. we look at title 10, title 32 resources in all aspects, all risk venue, like i said, not only aircraft but we utilize ltax for our agreements with la county fire, to mobilize fire engines to catalina island. we look at resources for debris cleaning, i found out there's a desalization battalion for fresh water, that's an i object credible resource for an earthquake. there's a variety of dod resources that cal fire can provide in a statewide environment. i think the biggest thing for me, there's several scenarios that are challenging us, one of which and one of our fears, and it's been in the newspaper so it's not a secret, but o
we are providing leadership in all areas that govern this country. technology, health, academia, commerce, art, entertainment, and government. today, we must come together, not only in celebration, but an acknowledgment of the work that lies ahead. we understand that this is a global economy. the opportunities are ones that we can only surpassed if we come together. we can win the future if we dream together, if we work together. as a society, as an economy, the best is yet to comment. let me leave you with this last idea. every moment affords us an opportunity to change the world. let's seize that moment in each and every moment that succeeds that moment and let's do that together in celebration of our asian-pacific heritage and recognition of the great heritage as all the people that make up san francisco and california. we will truly honored this month, our heritage and our future. thank you very much. [applause] >> ok. all right. we have some competition on the stage right now. >> a couple of other people we need to thank. we have a bunch of co-hosts, the san francisco board
400 city employees and about 500 consultants. puc is really embracing technology. we wanted to make sure we really had a system that would elevate all issues so we could address them in a timely manner. as you know, time is money. we have a construction management information system. it is a great tool to help us address construction and make it successful, as it is today. cmis is one of the first major tools we put in place. the next one is the san francisco online invoicing, where we are now working with the contractor and consultant to have them submit their invoices online. we are also working on electronic bidding systems. another way we can reduce the paperwork and all the other issues tied with the procurements. i live in san francisco. i am a rate-payer. i really care about the way we spend our money. systems like this that will allow transparency, clarity, accountability, and efficiency -- i think systems like this need to be applied to all parts of the city. we really strive to lead and embraced technology so we can be ahead of the game. [applause] >> we are spending $15 m
technology working group and delivered its group to congress and youth safety on the internet and you can read her plug. how's that for a plug? >> thank you very much. our parents guide is free and can be distributed at schools or parent nights or whatever, so we're happy to make them available to you at connect safety .org so a little bit more of the big picture. this is amazing panel of people who have resources and campaigns that can support and reinforce your fine work. so i am glad you stayedand we learned about bullying and preventions and solutions and just to reinforce getting the accurate picture bullying is a serious problem but it's not an epidemic. it's not on the rise. daift finkelhorn and director of the research center university of new hampshire and reviewed studies and bullying among youth is actually down in recent years. his colleague have actually stopped using the term of "bullying" and refer to peer aggression and i can go into definitions but i won't bore you. a subset of bullying is also not on the rise and based on researchers and their samples and other sc
and engage with the latest web and mobile technologies and they bring in entrepreneurers as guest speakers and share the work they're doing in our communities today and their career path and how technology influenced their lives so to spark america and the martinez brothers and others we thank you for your service. [applause] >> the next awardees will be recognized for their contributions in the field of business. to make this presentation we would like to invite to the stage the honorable from mexico mr. corona . [applause] >> jenny florez is the director -- i'm sorry. would you join us at the stage. [applause] jenny is a community development director of city northern california. she is responsible for the community development, investment in the community -- community redevelopment act program and making sure that under served communities in the marketplace have access to financial services and products. prior to her position with citi she served with the congress of california seniors a state wide nonprofit organization dedicated to assisting low income families on the issues of hea
by then the hhs health and human services chief technology officer todd park, we sought to have a health data palooza proceeded by health data jambs or modeling sessions, jams sounded more fun, we can invite entrepreneurs in and see what can be done and created real products within a few months. that is being rolled out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you think san francisco compares and what are some of the other cities that are doing really well in terms of open data? >> i should be clear. when san francisco is third, we have a pact. i'll add to that actually. what's great in san francisco is there is not just going to be a chief data offic
, wonderful technology, wi-fi access. if you envision this space and if you look that way you have a wonderful adult area. as you walk in from the mason street side, you have an amazing teen center for all the young adults. absolutely. yelling back here, [ applause ] . that was our deputy city librarian, what can we say? a wonderful space for children. this north beach library serves over 30,000 diverse residents and it's way overdue to have a state-of-the-art library. clean it's really a true partnership with our city departments and i want to thank our dpw folks and their team. mindy, lena, fantastic work in managing this project. [ applause ] and another superb partner in phil ginsburg, rec and park, thank you. [ applause ] this is going to be an amazing space that ties together the joe dimaggio park and you will hear more about that. it's wonderful to know that it really creates an amazing civic space for north beach and it wouldn't happen wouldn't fantastic support from the community. julie christinsen, a shout out to you. [ applause ] the. so throughout this ceremony, we're going to
of technology and our city administrator. but ultimately working with our department of public works and mohammed at the helm, making sure this got done on time within budget, having the architects and engineers under [speaker not understood] working with the expert laboratory folks from dph and the hiv clinic to make sure that we did it right. because the laboratories have to meet federal standards. but i think also a great kudos has to happen to our partners, both locally, regionally, and the federal government. we could not have done this without the 9-1/2 million dollars of recovery monies that we got through the federal government. we have herb schultz here from the department of human services federal government. they've been really at the forefront with us. certainly dan bernel representing leader pelosi. she has been really a stalwart fighter. when everybody was cutting funds, she preserved that money for us. and, of course, i've got to put out a big, big thanks to president obama because without that recovery money, we wouldn't be here talking about this today. so, thank you
-could be money, could be technology. and, in terms of bringing research to practice, things that are done in a laboratory or academic setting, if you will, sometimes are not readily translatable into real-world settings with those constraints happening and with a variety of audiences that are in a community setting. so, yeah, i think the same is true in the prevention field as well as in the treatment arena. and, tom, in terms of what we are studying, give us a brief overlook of what we are currently studying. i know nida has done a lot of research on the brain and so on and so forth, but what other areas of interest should a patient, for example, be cognizant about? i think the best way to think about it is the different stages of let us call it the course of addiction from prevention, as candice was talking about, through early intervention, through treatment, through continuing care and, ultimately, recovery. there's an active program of research from the basic through the clinical through the translational in each of those stages. in prevention, community-oriented studies have been un
look for information and for training materials, talk a little bit to us about the addiction technology transfer centers and the wealth of information that they can provide. well, our addiction technology transfer centers work with community providers, state authorities, tribes and peers, so that they would have access to information. so, you go to our web site and you can find information about a wide range of strategies and issues. and the theme that keeps surfacing here is that as behavioral health is part of health, you can't deal with health without dealing with behavioral health, and our attcs help get that information. we also have what's called our national registries of effective critical practice or nrep, which allows people to identify clinical strategies that have been shown to work for a wide variety of populations. and so they can go to samhsa's web site and look up nrep and see what kind of clinical strategies are being employed. so our link with the nih is an essential one. we have a blending initiative with the national institute of drug abuse where we're promoting effe
guess since those days there has been one important improvement, one technological improvement, that we use expensively to create interoperatability and that is ip networks built of sdparate systems and the network allows us to operate. as you see from our demonstration as you checked in this morning, as you ridge stered this morning, san francisco talking it oakland, talking to this ship, talking over cellular, talking across and with different networks. the challenge for interoperatability is beginning to be met, i would say, the challenge for interoperatability at the same time is about to get much greater. we as a nation are about to embark on the most ambitous, most challenging communications endeavor that we have ever attempted, which is the creating of purse net, the public safety broad band or 4g network. and with that brings the promise of new challenges for sure in interoperatability and new capabilities that we have never had before. in fact, no other country is as far along as we are, even though we're just starting. what we see is the opportunity there to interoperate i
the radio. but with the military this is a whole new set of radio frequencies, radio technology, even before the planning we didn't know what they had. it took us several planning opportunities and meetings to flush through some of that information and one of the biggest take aways for us, as a city we're required to have a tactical interoperatable communications plan. it describes how you interoperate in an emergency or an event within the city as well as regional partners. we don't have that with military and i think that's one of the biggest take aways, we need to really flesh out a document so we have captured who our contacts are, what technology they are going to bring to the table and start that initial planning from the get-go. we also had some technical challenges with land mobile radio. you know, we have the coverage issues, but we were stationed at the san francisco police department command van, i had some very sharp people there who were able to work through a lot of those interoperatability issues so a huge thank you to the police department and also the fire department and
was asked when i was running a technology company before i joined the board of supervisors to show up at the city of the site of a client. that city was new orleans. this was a few weeks after hurricane katrina, which we all know will be probably the greatest civil engineering set of blunders that our country has made in our country's history. and what we all learn from hurricane katrina is what happens when we don't have a community that is prepared and a set of relationships that is ready to be hit by the big one. which leads me to the third reason why i wake up at night. the neighborhoods that i represent in the northeast not only represent the oldest neighborhoods in our city, but some of the most vulnerable. we have some of the poorest residents. half of my district are recent immigrants who are mono lingual. i have hundreds of constituents who live in buildings that contain them where they live three, four, five people in a room that might be no larger than 10 by 15 feet, in buildings that are absolutely prone to earthquake, fire, and the next major disaster. and, so, i was aske
jury for the department of technology -- >> president torres: right. >> i worked on that as well as our i.t. director as well as our -- nancy hahn who runs insurance and controls and our vomp was to -- to the independent grand jury to the telecommunications department. >> president torres: which is under the jurisdiction of the puc. >> no it's not but we do use their services like citywide e-mail and citywide data. >> president torres: so you indicated the issues that we had with the department of technology. >> we did and we participated in the hearing that the board of supervisors had, i think it was a week and a half ago. >> president torres: thank you. any questions? >> any questions? okay. thank you very much. >> president torres: thank yo you. >> the next item is the quarterly budget report. >> it's a pleasure to give you some more good news today, and that good news is that water sales hav up. and the water sales being up has helped both our wastewater as well as our water enterprise. so in your packet today, i have three brief slides to walk through with you on that report. wate
. i think our audience, as you said, getting into the details and the technology involved, along with the team work and the race itself, will be incredibly great for theppreciate. i want to think the organizing committee, particularly the racing committee and steve partly and ian murray for their wonderful collaboration with the city. they have been working with us for 18 months, negotiating from permits to the race to the details and with all the difference to the agency's credit to the coast guard and the safety of the racers themselves and the audiences along the water and waterfront. i also want to thank the rec and park commission president, head of the organizing committee, that is mark buell and carry mcclellan, for their excellent work for helping to lead the city side of it. and i want to thank, of course, all the racing teams that have made the decision to start racing in this wonderful day of hours. that will be, again, the first time ever that you will be able to see these races from the shore. the book to use the technology to get the excitement down, right on the bo
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